UCUÚBA BUTTER (Virola surinamensis)

USES AND BENEFITS :

Ucuúba butter is excellent to produce fine soaps of greater consistency and durability, and can be a great replacement for animal tallow, as it avoids the problem of possible contamination of products by this ingredient. Rich in fatty acids such as myristic and lauric and in vitamins A and C, ucuúba butter is used in cosmetic formulations for continuous hydration, regeneration, and tissue healing. Its dry-touch butter is rich in trimyristin, a natural stimulant of the production of collagen and elastin, the two most important proteins for maintaining a young, firm, and elastic skin. When it comes to hair, it provides intense shine, hydration, nutrition and protects against external aggressions. It is recommended for use in the fabrication of lotions, moisturizing creams, soaps, hair products and more…

POPULAR USE:

As a home remedy, it is successfully applied in the treatment of rheumatism, arthritis, colic, thrush, and hemorrhoids. The hard and yellow butter can be used in combination with other ingredients to produce candles and vegetable soaps as a vegetable substitute for paraffin derived from oil. Soaps and creams based on ucuúba have proven to be effective as anti-inflammatory, healing, revitalizing and antiseptic treatments. The seed oil is used by Native Brazilians to make candles that produce a bright light, little smoke, and a pleasant smell. Its bark, when cooked, is used in asepsis and wound healing, while the sap is put, along with some cooked camapu (Physalis sp), on cotton gauze that is then used in the treatment of hemorrhoids (Le Cointe, 1947). Furthermore, its leaf extract has a protective action against infection caused by Schistosoma mansoni (Barata & Baker, 1973).

SPECIFICATIONS:

PRODUCT NAME: Ucuuba Butter

PRODUCT CODE: G021 – 5KG / G022 – 10KG

INCI LISTING: Virola Surinamensis seed oil

MANUFACTURING METHOD: cold pressed

COUNTRY OF ORIGIN: Brazil

CAS NUMBER # : 356065-37-7

EINECS NUMBER: not listed

NCM 1515 90 40 00

PACKAGE SIZES: 5kg e 10kg

STORAGE: keep the container tightly closed, stored in a cool, ventilated place and protected from light.

EXPIRY DATE: under normal storage conditions, 24 months after manufacture.

UCUUBA BUTTER – SPECIFICATIONS
CHARACTERISTICS UNIT DESCRIPTION
Appearance (25ºc) Solid
Color Appearance
Odor characteristic
Acid value mg NaOH/g < 30,0
Peroxide value meq O2/kg < 10,0
Iodine value g l2/kg 10 – 15
Saponification value mgKOH/g 220 – 330
Unsaponifiable value % < 3
Density 25º C g/ml 0,939
Refractive index
Melting temp. ºC 53
FATTY ACID COMPOSITION
Lauric acid (C 12:0) % weight 16,0 – 20,0
Myristic acid (C 14:0) % weight 72,0 – 76,0
Lauric acid (C 12:0) % weight 7,0 – 9,0
Saturated % 100
Unsaturated % 0

BOTANICAL INFORMATION:

Virola surinamensis (Rol.) belongs to the family Myristicaceae. In Brazil, it is commonly known as ucuúba, ucuúba-da-várzea (meadow ucuúba), and ucuúba branca (white ucuúba), among other names. The species is found anywhere from the Antilles to Brazil, passing through Tobago, Trinidad, Guyana, Southern Venezuela and Bolivia. In the Brazilian Amazon, it is abundant on the low islands flooded by the Atlantic tide, where it is one of the species with the highest occurrence among large trees. The tree reaches a height of 25 to 35 m and its name, in the Indigenous language, is ucu (grease) yba (tree). In the Brazilian Amazon, flowering happens from August to November and fruiting from January to July (Rodrigues, 1972, 1980). A mature tree can produce between 30 and 50 kg of seeds per year. The seeds are rich in fats whose content can reach up to 50% on a dry basis. Seed and fruit dispersion happens mainly through large birds such as the jacu (Penelope purpurascens) and the toucan (Ramphastos sulfuratus and Ramphastos swainsonii) and through small birds of short flight such as the surucuá (Trogon massena) and the udu or juruva (Baryphthengus martii), which eat the aryl and regurgitate the still viable seeds under or near the treetops, where they germinate after 2 to 5 weeks. Also monkeys (AteIes qeottrovii), who, through their feces, act as seed dispersers (Howeet al., 1985). Seedlings of this species are consumed by cotias (Dasyprocta punctetei), pacas (Agouti paca), coatis (Nasua nericei), deer (Odocoileus virginiana and Mazama americana), squirrels (Sciurus granatensis) and rats (Proechimys centralis) (Molofsky & Fisher, 1993).

JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC
HARVEST SEASON LOW SEASON

SOURCE:

LORENZI, H: Arvores Brasileiras – vol. 01. 1992, Instituto Plantarum, Nova Odessa – SP 384 pp. .

PESCE, C .: Oleaginosas da Amazônia, 1941, Oficinas Gráficas da Revista Veterinária, Belém / PA .

VAN DEN BERG, ME: Plantas Medicinais na Amazônia – Contribuição ao seu conhecimento sistemático, 1993, Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi, Belém. 206 pp. .

Virola Surinamensis: Silvicultura e Usos Neves E.; Santos A.; Colombo E., PR2 002/SSN

Manaus: INPA, 1979. v. 1.