PATAUÁ OIL (Oenocarpus bataua)

USES AND BENEFITS :

Pataua oil, also called Ungurahua, Majo, or Seje, is extracted from the pulp of the pataua fruit. Pataua oil is a light greenish-yellow liquid with a mild scent and high oleic acid content (Omega-9). Pataua oil is similar in its composition to olive oil and can be consumed in salads or used in preserves, but its greatest value is related to the treatment of scalp issues such as itching, dandruff and hair loss. Pataua oil is known to stimulate and regenerate follicular cells; it helps to control scalp disorders caused by bacterial infections and increases circulation and capillary strength. It can be used as a supplement in the treatment of early hair loss, male and female pattern baldness, and alopecia areata.

Pataua oil also has an anti-inflammatory effect when used topically. This makes it beneficial for diseases related to dry skin, such as eczema. Its constant use helps to tone, soothe, and smooth the skin and restore its natural hydration balance.

SPECIFICATIONS:

PRODUCT NAME: Pataua Oil

INCI: Oenocarpus bataua fruit oil

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Oenocarpus bataua

COUNTRY OF ORIGIN: Brazil

PRODUCT CODE: G025 / 5L – GO26/ 10 L

MANUFACTURING METHOD: cold pressed

EINCS NUMBER: não aplicável

NCM: 1515.90.40

PACK SIZES: 5,0 L – 10 ,0 L

SECONDARY PACKAGING: (cardboard box with 2 x 5 kg or 1 x 10 kg)

STORAGE: keep the container tightly closed, stored in a cool, ventilated place and protected from light.

EXPIRY DATE: under normal storage conditions, 24 months after manufacture.

PATAUA OIL – SPECIFICATIONS
CHARACTERISTICS UNIT VALUES
Appearance (25 oC) liquid
Color Greenish
Odor characteristic
Acid value % weight < 10,0
Peroxide value 10 meq 02/kg < 10,0
Iodine value g I2/kg 70 – 83
Saponification value mgKOH/g 190 – 200
Unsaponifiable value % < 1,3
Density 25 oC g/ml 0,905 – 0,9180
Refractive index (40 oC) 1,46 – 1,4693
Melting temp. oC 16

FATTY ACID COMPOSITION

Palmitic acid (C16:0) % weight 6,0 – 15,0
Palmitoleic acid (C16:1) % weight < 2
Stearic acid (C18:0) % weight 2,0 – 9,0
Oleic acid (C18:1 – Omega 9) % weight 68,0 – 83,0
Linoleic acid (C18:2 – Omega 6) % weight 2,0 – 9,0
Linolenic acid (C18:2 – Omega 3) % weight < 5
Saturated % 16
Unsaturated % 84

BOTANICAL INFORMATION:

Linoleic acid (C18:2 – Omega 6) The pataua palm (Oenocarpus bataua Mart.) is found in the lowland, humid forests of the Amazon River, especially on the north side, all the way up to the British Guyana. They are often grouped in places that are called patauasais. When the plant is young, the trunk is completely covered with long, black, hard thorns produced by the cracking of the leaf tissue. The rachis is used by the indigenous peoples to make arrows for their blowguns and the leaves are used to make baskets or temporary homes. The adult tree sheds the wrapping of the leaves and is left with a smooth trunk, which reaches up to 15 m in height and produces large clusters of fruits of a purple, almost black color. These fruits are covered with a bluish-white powder and, when separated, they leave the epicarp shiny and provide a drink of grey color and pleasant taste.

The pataua palm is a beautiful tree, with a thick trunk, long leaves, and wide leaflets. Fruits the size of small plums (2-3 cm) are gathered in a large cluster, which ripens from September to January. They have a soft and yellow pulp that is externally protected by a purplish, almost black thin layer, which covers an immature, grey core protected by very resistant filaments. The average weight of a fresh pataua fruit is eight grams. It is composed of 39.25% oily pulp and 60.75% kernel. The proportion of oil contained in the fruit is 18.19% in the oily pulp, 3% in the kernel and 7.4% in the whole fruit. The oil extracted from the pataua mesocarp appears as a transparent, greenish liquid, with a light odour. The expected average production of one tree is 2 clusters per year, equivalent to 32 kg of fruit, of which up to 2.4 litres of oil per palm can be obtained in the mechanical press.

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SOURCE:

PESCE, C.: Oleaginosas da Amazônia. 2 ed., rev. e atual. Belém: Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi, Núcleo de Estudos Agrários e Desenvolvimento Rural, 2009.

BALICK, M.J. “Jessenia and Oenocarpus: neotropical oil plants worthy of domestication.” Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), Plant Production and Protection Paper, N°. 88, Rome, 1988.

HIDALGO, P.S.P. et al.: “Amazon oilseeds: Chemistry and antioxidant activity of patawa (Oenocarpus bataua Mart.).” Rev. Virtual Quim. 8, pp. 130–140, 2016.

DARNET, S.H. et al.: “Nutritional composition, fatty acid, and tocopherol contents of buriti (Mauritia flexuosa) and patawa (Oenocarpus bataua) fruit pulp from the Amazon region.” Cienc. Tecnol. Aliment. 31, pp. 488–491, 2011.

MONTUFAR, R. et al.: “Oenocarpus bataua Mart. (Arecaceae): Rediscovering a Source of High Oleic Vegetable Oil from Amazonia.” J. Am. Oil Chem. Soc. 87, pp. 167–172, 2010.

PESCE, C. OLEAGINOSAS DA AMAZÔNIA. BELÉM: OFICINAS GRÁFICAS DA REVISTA VETERINÁRIA, 1941.

SHANLEY, P.: Cymerys, M. & Galvão, J. Frutíferas da mata na vida amazônica. Belém, 1998.